The Top 10 Men’s Dress Shirts to Own

OCBD Options by oxford cloth button down on December 20, in Men's Clothing Reviews, Style with 23 Comments Tweet As I am currently assessing my own OCBD needs I thought that this would be the perfect time to put a list of the current OCBD options together.

Press and as available from O'Connell's Sero Purist and blends. If you like going tieless, favor semi-spread collars instead of full spread collars. Our children's private schools prefer we purchase their uniform oxfords from Land's End. Many avoid garments that have been treated with a Non-Iron finish.

How to Wear an Oxford Shirt Easily one of the best shirts for men, the humble Oxford shirt for men is a time-honoured wardrobe essential that every guy should own. The ultimate shirt for both casual and formal looks, and with such a variety of colours and fabrics, you’ll always find the best oxford shirt .
Best of all, you can and should wear an OCBD unbuttoned with a loose tie on weekends or evenings at the pub. It shows you can dress up or down, and opt to look put together, even on your personal time.
Wearing OCBD shirts untucked is an abomination. Along with men wearing tank top undershirts in public, backward baseball caps, tramp stamps, vinyl siding and flip flops; it's a .
How to Wear an Oxford Shirt Easily one of the best shirts for men, the humble Oxford shirt for men is a time-honoured wardrobe essential that every guy should own. The ultimate shirt for both casual and formal looks, and with such a variety of colours and fabrics, you’ll always find the best oxford shirt .
Best of all, you can and should wear an OCBD unbuttoned with a loose tie on weekends or evenings at the pub. It shows you can dress up or down, and opt to look put together, even on your personal time.
History Of The Oxford Shirt

OVER THE NEXT YEAR, I PLAN TO BUY NEW KHAKIS AND BUTTON DOWN SHIRTS THAT ARE:

Wearing OCBD shirts untucked is an abomination. Along with men wearing tank top undershirts in public, backward baseball caps, tramp stamps, vinyl siding and flip flops; it's a .

Noticing a pattern here? White and light blue are the foundation of your shirt lineup. You could easily get away with wearing white and light blue shirts for your entire life. What do you get when you combine a white shirt and a blue shirt? You get a white and blue striped shirt. Green, pink, gray, it can all work. These look great tieless with a solid suit or sportcoat, or, under a sweater with jeans or chinos.

Starting to break free from solids, but still sticking with a white and blue foundation. A windowpane is just different enough from the stripes that most guys default to. When it comes to the size of the squares, ideal is between a pencil eraser and a quarter. If your wardrobe leans more casual, button down collars on these shirts would absolutely work and be more versatile for day-to-day life.

Color is up to you. Black and white obviously offers the most contrast, but deep blue, green, even red can deliver. The button down collar strategy would go the same here for the gingham shirts as it does for windowpane. Live and work in a more casual environment? Button down collars might just be the way to go. They wash well and can be worn straight from the dryer. I have a gardening crush on your friend who still grows plants in cans.

Awhile ago, one of your commenters mentioned Uni Glo and I have enjoyed their solid flannel shirts enough to give their oxfords a try. I rediscovered them a couple of years ago and I'm phasing out my Ralph Laurens as they are much thinner and hold starch much less well these days and replacing them with the LL Bean version. In fact, I'm wearing one right now.

The entire Brooks Bros. CDV changed the comp. If you read the company reviews at Glassdoor. I have become increasingly less inclined to shop at BB and I have had an account with them since Almost all of the products, but especially as noted here, the OCBDs have less material in them, are cut skimpier are NOT true to size and do not wear or last as long as their predecessors. In addition, the OCBDs have had their collars shortened so that they do not fold over and cover thicker material ties as well as past versions.

As a lifelong BB customer, it pains me to say that and our impending divorce will be just as painful as any lengthy marriage. I have to agree with everything Paul has said above. Having been a loyal BB customer since college, I have seen the slow steady decline in quality and value. There was a time where, BB was the only placed I shopped. My wife would kid me by saying if BB went out of business I would walk around naked.

After many years and way too many washings it still looks great. They have not held up as well. In fact over Christmas I went through and did a closet purge of shirts that needed to go. The vast majority were BB that I had purchased in the past several years. I visited a BB store recently to look for replacements. I was shocked by not only the lack of quality, but the significant increase in price. I contacted Mercer and was very impressed by their samples and reviews.

It looks like I will be moving my business to them. Join the club of former BB loyalists. I try not to be dogmatic about clothing. Most of my dress shirts are Brooks Brothers wash and wear which I do myself they still need pressing. Commercial laundering is hard on clothes, too. But I'm retiring this year at age 70 might make it to 71 , so my habits will be changing, maybe.

I tend to stick with Ralph Lauren oxfords for my husband and me. I did purchase 3 wrinkle-free shirts from Eddie Bauer about 12 years ago for myself. I normally don't buy WF but they had french cuffs which I adore, and have cuff links that were my late father's that I love to wear. The shirts are still in good condition all these years later. I tried the treated shirts from LL Bean, mainly for emergencies when I needed a dress shirt and hadn't made it to the cleaner's. I found they wore on the creases quickly, were uncomfortable in warm weather and stained very easily after having been laundered 5 to 10 times.

I only wear Mercer shirts now. Yes, I do agree. I have to toothbrush scrub the cuffs inside the wrist, as my hand moisturizer seems to wreak havoc there. I like Tradlands for made-in-USA women's shirts: OCBDs, flannels, organic cotton options, and nice madras in the summer.

As BB became a mass merchandiser and quality declined, I tried the usual suspects - J. And as someone else noted, dealing with Serena and David Mercer is a pleasure. I have a lot of old BB and Ralph Lauren but today both companies are a pale shade of what they used to be have you seen the models for RL lately? I've contacted them about this but did not get a response. I've had good luck with Michael Spencer. I had to have my Mercer shirts re-tailored because the billowy cut does not work for me.

I'm really enjoying Tradlands Elms oxford and will probably get the equivalent in blue. PS - both companies will make shirts with a narrower profile if you want that. With Mercer in particular, you probably need to phone them to navigate the sizing; Michael Spencer offers pre-set options for a narrower cut.

After years of addiction to traditionaloxford cloth, I have discovered and switched to Mercer's pinpoint and end-on-end fabrics. I can't say enough about the quality of Ann Mashburn shirts. I also want to add that the service at their stores is impeccable. For those of us who remember when Oxford cloth was not thick, Lands' End is still the place to go. Many avoid garments that have been treated with a Non-Iron finish.

While some swear by them for their crisp appearance, ease, and for the money they save on laundering, more note the edges wear prematurely, they do not breathe, many don't trust the chemicals, and they simply do not look "right".

Some opinions from earlier comments:. Exclusively with Non-Iron Finish. Mostly with Non-Iron Finish. It can be difficult for women to wear Men's shirts often for two reasons. One is that Men's shirts are long and can thus look a tad odd if a woman is not on the taller side. The other is that Men's shirts are not often forgiving enough through the hip area and thus to have a shirt fit comfortably around the hips one must size up which can then look bulky throughout the chest and shoulder area.

Full-cut classic Men's shirts can be an exception if you are tall enough. The full cut should extend to the the hips so you can order a smaller neck size for the upper body and while they are usually long, some traditional tails are shaped in a way that is more flattering than most. I only have six or seven of them in my closet right now, but that's because they wear so well that I haven't needed to replace them.

They make the nonpareil, archetypal, classic OCBD. Old school grownup shop. Definitely not for J Crew -AF hybrid metrosexuals. The Mercer shirt is a completely different garment than for example anything on offer from Brooks.

And I mean anything Now, whether those differences are worth paying extra for is up to you. As for the full cut:

Evolution of the OCBD

The Oxford cloth button-down shirt (or OCBD for short) is a wardrobe essential every man should own. Our guide to the Oxford shirt includes the history of the garment, how to wear an Oxford shirt. William F. Buckley Jr. in Oxford Cloth Button Down Shirt In the 50s Brooks Brothers Invent the OCBD On a trip across the pond to England, American haberdashery Brooks Brothers spotted this trend and decided it could become a cultural icon and menswear staple. GAP Oxford Standard Fit Shirt — $ The definition of classic — a simple white Oxford. Just a touch more expensive than the first option on this list, this GAP Oxford is yet another basic that the brand continues to get right.